House Of Three opens its first offline store

The Bengaluru-based label showcases its latest collection, Les Fleurs du Printemps

Rashmi Rajagopal Lobo Published :  20th July 2018 04:22 PM   |   Published :   |  20th July 2018 04:22 PM
727A7251_result

DESIGNER duo Sounak Sen Barat and Anu Shyamsundar of House of Three believes that while making people look good is what they do best, the thought behind it doesn’t necessarily have to be frivolous. When we pay them a visit at their newly opened store in Indira Nagar, housed within furniture boutique, Chairs & Company, they take us through their exquisite collections, each crafted with a theme that will force its wearers to think. For instance, Asliha, one of their menswear collections takes inspiration from Mughal artillery, which find expression through embroidered motifs on shirts and jackets. “The Mughal era has influenced the country so greatly. Asliha is our way of artistically reminding people who we really are and through it, we also wanted to talk about acceptance,” explains Sounak, who started the label with Anu, about 10 years ago.

Flower power

While they retail out of multidesigner boutiques such as Ogaan in Delhi and Atosa, Mumbai, the Indira Nagar address is their first standalone store. Whitewashed exposed brick walls, antique furniture (some dating back 100 years), framed art, statement light fixtures and an edgy grey and white colour scheme offset with floral and striped wallpaper in vibrant hues give the space an easy, welcoming vibe. “Some of the prints we’ve used on the upholstery in our furniture are from our latest collection, Les Fleurs du Printemps, which is a celebration of flowers,” shares Anu, adding that their label is divided into couture, pret and diffusion. The pastel-hued garments of Les Fleurs are embellished with 3D flowers each made with individually hand-cut petals. Employing a mix of habutai silk, Chanderi silk and novelty knits, the garments stay true to the essence of the label’s design philosophy, which is celebrating the marriage of contrasts — fluidity and structure, darkness and light, and softness with solidity.

For Sounak, nationalism is an integral part of his design philosophy. “It doesn’t mean just standing for the national anthem at cinema halls. We need to be more involved. And as designers, we do it by bringing Indian crafts to the fore, by engaging with craftsmen and weavers from across the country,” he says in conclusion. 

Rs.5,000 upwards. At 12th Main, Indira Nagar

Comments