Chennai-based hospital has installed a vibrant miniature clock model depicting the eight-course healthy meal

Using art as a medium to spread awareness, the hospital has installed a vibrant miniature clock model depicting the eight-course healthy meal commonly prescribed to patients with diabetes

author_img Vaishali Vijaykumar Published :  02nd December 2021 03:36 PM   |   Published :   |  02nd December 2021 03:36 PM
Using art as a medium to spread awareness

Using art as a medium to spread awareness

‘Managing diabetes is not science, it’s an art.’ This medical maxim is a constant reminder that there’s no one-time cure for this lifelong condition, and there’s much more to the healing process than just medication. The art of controlling diabetes by effectively keeping certain lifestyle modifications under check is a skill that can only be mastered over time, doctors report. Known as the diabetes capital of the world, India is home to 77 million people living with the condition.

With November being observed as Diabetes Awareness Month, and November 14 marked as World Diabetes Day, various diabetes organisations shed light on preventive measures to lead a healthy life. One such innovative initiative by Chennai-based Dr A Ramachandran’s Diabetes Hospital has been garnering appreciation from people for the work being done.

Using art as a medium to spread awareness, the hospital has installed a vibrant miniature clock model depicting the eight-course healthy meal commonly prescribed to patients with diabetes. Anusha Krishnamurthy, the artist behind the concept, decodes it for us. “The hospital approached me for this assignment after seeing my food miniatures. I’d carried a few models created by me for their reference.

The doctors and I brainstormed ideas and zeroed in on this wholesome meal concept. Because with dietary modifications, miracles can happen and we can reverse the condition. Having something colourful will also pique the interest of people across age groups,” shares Anusha, who has been receiving great responses for her work on her official Instagram page.

The eight hands on the miniature clock depict meals starting from early morning until dinner. Explaining its elements, Anusha points out, “There are 35 food items. The first meal of the day includes biscuits, coffee, nuts (almonds and cashew), water; breakfast has pongal and idli for south Indians and dhokla for north Indians; mid-morning meal has fruits, salads, lemonade, and buttermilk; lunch has a vegetarian meal (jeera peas pulao, paneer, roti, curd, and salad, and a non-vegetarian meal (sambar, rasam, fish, rice, egg, curd, beans, and carrot), basket for vegetables and potato; tea time has chana dal, puffed rice, and tea; soup time includes tomato soup, wheat bread sandwich, and paneer salad; dinner has paratha, dosa, idiyappam; and bed-time is fruits.”

A portion of the canvas, on which the miniature clock is fixed, features miniatures of restricted items such as chocolates, sweets, pastries, beverages, and junk foods. “I had two weeks to complete the project. Procuring materials was challenging. On top of that, this is my first time designing non-vegetarian miniatures. I had to Google how a pomfret fish would look and replicate the model. But it was a meaningful and enriching experience. I got to learn a lot about the meal portions that can even reverse the condition and now I cn educate my social circle,” notes Anusha, who specialises in miniature art and beaded jewellery. Besides, she’s been taking thematic art workshops for kids during the pandemic..

By roping in artists, hospitals can take such serious messages in a fun and light way to a lay person, suggests Anusha. A software engineer by day and artist by night, the Mandaveli resident’s plates are full with projects in the pipeline.

For details, visit tvesha_handmade_Chennai

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