A retrospective exhibition on late eminent painter K Sreenivasulu features a potpourri of natural colours and techniques

The 23-day-long exhibition has visitors reliving the Madras Art Movement through his illustrious and intimate artwork on canvas and paper

author_img Priyanka Chandani Published :  26th November 2021 03:00 AM   |   Published :   |  26th November 2021 03:00 AM
Art work by (late) K Sreenivasulu

Art work by (late) K Sreenivasulu

It was between 1950-80 when eminent painter (late) K Sreenivasulu, brought a spotlight on the Madras Art Movement through his paintings and sketches. With his vision and creativity, he painted stories on canvas which continue to inspire artists of all ages. And the ongoing retrospective exhibition on the painter at Varija Gallery of DakshinaChitra Museum pays homage to the versatile artist and his instrumental body of work. The 23-day-long exhibition has visitors reliving the Madras Art Movement through his illustrious and intimate artwork on canvas and paper.

A master stroke

“His focus on the folk arts and his portrayal could well be considered as archival of the life in the early ’50s. And it is important for art lovers and students to see his work and perceive it differently,” says Lakshmi Krishnamurthy, a student of K Sreenivasulu and the former Head of the Visual Arts Dept, RDCFA, Kalakshetra Foundation, Chennai.

Known for his pen and ink drawings on paper and tempera on canvas, the exhibition features Sreenivasulu’s traditional and contemporary drawings including the masks and totem series. Traversing through watercolours to draw long broad eyes and stylised figures dancing around town, watching bioscopes, admiring toys or riding in a cart, Sreenivasulu’s paintings on display beautifully feature the traditional motion art on orange hues.

“He created a new technique by fusing watercolour paintings done on organdie with fibre on the one side and resin on the other. He was a master artist, teacher and a craft person with such elan,” she adds.

Inspired by mythology and folk tales, the paintings represent the traditional narrative in the most modern way. And one of the artworks on the display The Visualisation of Nataraja is an apt example of it. “Old techniques could influence the evolution of newer dimensions. His work is a wonderful potpourri of natural colous, techniques and brushes,” adds the former head.

On till November 30. At DakshinaChitra Museum

Priyanka.chandani@newindianexpress.com

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